Cosy Minestrone Soup

Cosy minestrone soup is the perfect sick day bowl of health. Whether you just need warming up on a cold day or are looking for a hug in a bowl.

minestrone soup

Minestrone Soup

Restorative Wellbeing
Cosy hug in a bowl
Course Soup
Servings 6

Ingredients
  

  • 1 onion diced
  • 2 carrots sliced into half moons
  • 3 ribs celery diced
  • 1 large potato diced
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • pinch chilli flakes
  • 400g chopped tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup black or green lentils
  • 7 cups vegetable stock
  • 1 cup ditalini or other small pasta
  • 2 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

Instructions
 

  • Add the onion to a large pan with 1 tbsp water, and put over a medium heat. Allow the onion to soften adding more water 1 tbsp at a tie if needed, to stop the onion from sticking to the bottom of the pan.
  • Once the onion has softened, add in the carrots, celery, potato, garlic and chilli flakes. Stir well and allow to sit on the heat for a further 2-3 minuets.
  • Add in the tomatoes, stock and lentils, and bring to a gentle simmer. Continue to simmer for 15 mins until the potatoes are tender.
  • Add the pasta and allow to simmer for a further 5-10 minuets until the pasta is soft.
  • Finally add the vinegar and lemon juice. Stir well and remove from the heat. serve straight away or portion out for meal prep and store for 2-3 days in the fridge.

If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com


Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.

Vegan Pizza Rolls

We love a junk food treat. However in this household it looks a bit different. We like to get the most out of every meal, experimenting with ways to make them as nutrient dense as possible, while still keeping that comfort factor! When it comes to junk food classics like Pizza, it all starts with the base. Taking the time to make our pizza dough base from scratch gives us the opportunity to ditch all the preservatives and opt for a more nutritious wholewheat flour – over processed white flour.

Once we have our fluffy base sorted we move onto a hidden veggie marinara. Skipping the sugar laden and preservative packed ready made supermarket sauces, to deliver some sneaky nutrient dense pizza sauce. We often have this ready made up in the fridge for some quick last minuet meals…. however failing being that prepared, plain tomato passata is a great quick win. Although passata isn’t as nutrient dense as our hidden veggie marinara, it still helps your avoid the unnecessary preservatives that can cause hidden problems.

marinara sauce in a cup
Passata

Finally we can start choose the best bit, the toppings!! We don’t skimp on toppings, we pile them high and make a real feast. Pizza toppings is a chance to be creative and experiment and if you follow us on social media – the weirder the better.

Vegan Pizza Rolls

Ingredients
  

  • 1 batch wholefood pizza dough recipe below
  • 4 tbsp Passata (or hidden veg marinara) recipe below
  • 1/2 cup favourite vegan cheese

Optional fillings

  • 2 tbsp sweetcorn
  • 1/4 cup shredded kale
  • 1/2 tsp chilli flakes
  • 1 tbsp fresh shredded basil
  • 2 tbsp sliced olives

Instructions
 

  • Roll out the pizza dough with a rolling pin into a rectangle.
    1 batch wholefood pizza dough
  • Spread out the passata onto the pizza dough.
    4 tbsp Passata (or hidden veg marinara)
  • Sprinkle the cheese over the top and your chosen toppings
    1/2 cup favourite vegan cheese, 2 tbsp sweetcorn, 1/4 cup shredded kale, 1/2 tsp chilli flakes, 1 tbsp fresh shredded basil, 2 tbsp sliced olives
  • Roll the dough up from the smaller edge. Try to keep it tight as you can without squishing out the fillings.
  • Cut the rolled up dough into rounds, then place straight onto a lined baking tray.
  • Bake in a preheated oven at 200c, for 20 minuets or until the dough it turning golden brown.
@restorative_wellbeing

Home made vegan pizza rolls! Just one of the awesome recipes you can make with our versatile wholewheat pizza dough recipe!! . #vegan #pizzarolls #plantbased

♬ Blame It on the Boom Boom – Black Stone Cherry

Basic wholewheat pizza dough

Ingredients
  

  • 7 grams dried yeast
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 280 grams wholewheat flour
  • 120 ml warm water
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 60 ml olive oil
  • extra flour for dusting

Instructions
 

  • Mix the yeast, sugar and water in a small bowl and set aside for 5 minuets until foamy (if it doesn't foam your yeast may be gone off)
  • Combine the remaining ingredients with the foamy yeast mixture until they come together to form a mass. This is quickly done in a food processor on dough mode (the lowest mode)
  • Once completely mixed together super the the dough into however many pizzas you are making and knead them for roughly 2 minuets each.
  • Put the dough into a lightly oiled bowl in a warm place loosely covered cling film for around an hour when it will have doubled in size.
  • Preheat oven to 190c and lightly oil a baking tray.
  • Gently shape the dough and top with your favourite toppings
  • Bake for 20-25 minuets until crisp and golden

Lentil and veggie Marinara

Hidden veggie and protein marinara sauce, perfect for pasta and pizza
Course Main Course
Cuisine Italian

Equipment

  • High Speed Blender

Ingredients
  

  • 1/2 cup red lentils
  • 3 cups passata
  • 1 cup spinach
  • 2 red bell peppers
  • 1/4 red onion
  • 1 courgette
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • 3 tsp basil dried
  • 1 cup veggie stock

Instructions
 

  • Put all the ingredients together in a large pan, and heat to a simmer on the stove.
  • Allow to cook through for 20 minuets until all the veggies and lentils are soft and cooked through.
  • Allow the sauce to cool fully
  • Once cool add to a high speed blender and blend until smooth and creamy.
  • Use straight away or store in an air tight container in your fridge for 2-3 days.

Notes

Make this recipe at the start of the week then use it again and again as a pizza toppings or base for pasta dishes. 

If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com

This blog post contains amazon affiliate links, which I gain money for qualifying purchases. These purchases make running this blog possible, and I would like to express my gratitude for every form of support towards my work. 

Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.

Pumpkin Spice Latte Smoothie

Creamy dreamy pumpkin spice latte smoothie!

This ain’t your usual basic PBL.

Is it really pumpkin spice with out some pumpkin? We think not. So we had to make a pumpkin spice smoothie with that added caffeine kick to help you get going in the mornings.

Naturally sweetened with bananas and of course pumpkin purée that smoothie ensures you get a steady slow release of energy alongside the burst from the coffee. This can help you stay energised and full for longer than your standard PSL

Why we love Pumpkin Spice!!

Pumpkin spice is not only a modern day classic flavour but when done right, it is also the perfect Autumnal health staple. Making sure to include actual pumpkin in your spiced treats will provide you with a delicious way gain an abundance of Vitamin A. Vitamin A is a great beneficial nutrient for the colder months, playing an important role in immune system function and maintaining healthy skin!

Pumpkin Spice Latte Smoothie

Indulgent twist on the autumnal classic PSL
Course Breakfast
Servings 1

Equipment

  • High Speed Blender

Ingredients
  

  • 1/4 cup Pumpkin Puree
  • 1/4 cup Cold brew espresso frozen into ice cubes
  • 1 cup Coconut milk
  • 1/2 tsp Pumpkin spice
  • 1 Banana frozen

Instructions
 

  • Add all the ingredients to a blender cup and blend until completely smooth.
    1/4 cup Pumpkin Puree, 1/4 cup Cold brew espresso frozen, 1 cup Coconut milk, 1/2 tsp Pumpkin spice, 1 Banana frozen

Can’t get enough of the pumpkin spice flavours?


If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com


This blog post contains amazon affiliate links, which I gain money for qualifying purchases. These purchases make running this blog possible, and I would like to express my gratitude for every form of support towards my work. 


Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.

Nutrition Facts of Onions: The good the bad and the IBS

Praised for their immune enhancing properties, but how much do we really know about the nutrition facts of onions? Should they be a staple in our diets or could they be doing more harm than good?

Lets dig a little deeper.

Onions (Allium cepa), from the classic large bulb vegetable to its many relations of shallots, scallions, leeks and even chives. All have a vast array of health benefits and the ability to greatly enhance the flavour of many savoury dishes; so it is no wonder that throughout our cookbooks and all of Restorative Wellbeing, there is an inclination to encourage the use of onions.

vegetables harvest fresh basket
Photo by Markus Spiske on Pexels.com

However, although all looks great on paper, our bodies don’t all work the same. As many benefits there are for people to eat onions, there are also downsides. Onions are the perfect highlight of how important it is to listen to your body. Our bodies are the perfect tool to guide us to heal; without that connection, the healing will be un uphill struggle.

To help you figure out if using onions in your diet is of benefit or harm to your overall health, we are going to break it down simply into the benefits and downfalls.

Benefits

  • Nutrient Dense. Source of vitamin C and vitamin B6, and even small amounts of iron and magnesium
  • High in Antioxidants. Including, fisetin, quercetin.
  • Lowers risk of stomach and colorectal cancers.
  • Blood sugar control. Due to flavonoid antioxidants.
  • Boost bone density. Due to quercetin antioxidants protecting from free-radical bone damage.
  • Antibacterial properties. – creating a poor environment for harmful bacteria to live. Making it useful as a tropical treatment for fungal and bacterial infections.
  • Prebiotics – essential for maintaining good gut health.

Downfalls

  • Aggravates IBS – A common trigger for IBS and a no go for FODMAP diet followers.
  • Allergic reactions – Not a common allergen but still one to look out for.
  • Eye irritation – Caused by the release of lachrymator compounds triggering the lacrimal glands to become irritated; we have all at some point found ourselves crying while chopping onions.
  • Heartburn – There are many theories as to why onions are more likely to cause heartburn for some, from their slower digestion, to irritating the esophagus, but it is yet to be tested.
  • Anticoagulant

IBS, Crohns and Coeliac

The group of people who this will be most significant for, is those with inflammatory diseases that affect the digestive system such as, IBS (irritable bowl syndrome), Crohns and Coeliac. As digestive diseases are very personal, learning the ability to sit, listen and observe, the signals of the body is essential to learning how to manage and heal from it. What affects one person will not necessarily affect you in the same way. Although you can gain guidance from sources such as Restorative Wellbeing, your body will be your best friend in this journey.

Those with chronic digestive problems often find a Low-FODMAP diet is a great starting point to discovering what foods suit their bodies best. Low-FODMAP is a three stage diet, starting with the elimination of FODMAP foods. This usually lasts 3-6 weeks. The second stage involves a slow steady process of reintroducing foods and noticing any that tigger symptoms, to find what triggers you. The final stage is adapting to your own personalised diet that you will have discovered through the introduction phase.

Many people who have gone through the Low-FODMAP process have found that onions have to be eliminated from their diet. However there are ways to avoid the causes of digestive problems from onions while still enjoying some of their benefits and flavour.

Low-FODMAP alternatives

  • Infused oils. Captureing the flavour of onions without the FODMAP properties of the onion being digested.
  • Spring onions/scallions/green onions tops. Just the green tops are Low-FODMAP
  • Chives. Part of the allium family, giving a subtle onion flavour when used as a garnish on dishes.
  • Leek tops. the same as with sping onions, stick to the greens and you will avoid the high FODMAP properties. A more subtle flavour than other alliums, but should help add nutrition and depth to your meals.
  • Asafoetida powder. Also known as hing, a traditional India seasoning that has a subtle onion flavour. (avoid if your are trying to conceive)

Low-FODMAP Recipes.

Conclusion

In short, if you are free from digestive issues, allergens or prone to heartburn, onions should definitely be a go to in your diet. The whole allium family of foods are abundant in health benefits to support your overall health. If you do find that onions prove to affect your health negatively, don’t overlook alternatives, that can still provide flavour and nutritions benefits to your meals.

Onion Recipes


If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com


Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.

Lazy Baked Falafel

Falafel has become a vegan staple, but who has time to be standing frying them all day! If your feeling time short try these lazy baked falafel, the perfect meal prep falafel.

There are so many things I love about these falafel not just they time convenience. Lower is saturated fat and even kid approved, you will never need another falafel recipe.

The ever popular falafel

Falafels actually started to become popular in the 1950s as a Middle Eastern street food. The rise in popularity in western culture however has been put down the to increase in vegan and wholefood health culture. With falafels being high in protein, and anti-inflammatory herbs and spices, it makes the perfect grab and go lunch. Classically paired in a pitta with salad and tahini or hummus, the falafel evolved to be used in a vast array of dishes. Personally I am here for falafel being added to everything, Ive even been known to use these bad boys as a replacement for meatballs with passata. They are so versatile, why not?

However the traditional falafel is deep fried to get that beautiful crisp vs fluffy texture contrast. Something not so appealing to the wholefoods movement. These simple baked falafel will help you enjoy all the flavour we love from falafel whilst still capturing the texture (no dried nasty supermarket falafel worries here).

close up shot of chickpeas
Photo by Marina Leonova on Pexels.com

Keep it moist

However the traditional falafel is deep fried to get that beautiful crisp vs fluffy texture contrast. Something not so appealing to the wholefoods movement. These simple baked falafel will help you enjoy all the flavour we love from falafel whilst still capturing the texture (no dried nasty supermarket falafel worries here).

The secret to getting that perfect texture combo in a baked falafel comes from starting with the right moisture level. Pop them in the oven already a little dry and they will dry out so much more. Getting this right will also help the chickpeas to blend down, avoiding that overly crumbly texture.To get this right you are going to need to add small amounts of water very slowly during the blending process. Add too much and you also at risk of creating sloppy poorly formed falafels. You are looking for a smooth mouldable dough.

Ways to eat your falafel

Falafels are so versatile and this version is no different. You can use your baked falafels in many other dishes as a delicious plant based protein source. Try pairing them with these dishes to get youstarted

Lazy baked falafels

Deliciously fluffy baked falafel, perfect for batch cooking on those bust weeks.

Equipment

  • 1 food processor

Ingredients
  

  • 400 g cooked chickpeas (14oz)
  • 1 red onion
  • 1 cup fresh corriander
  • 1 tsp pink salt (sea salt is also good)
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper ground
  • 1 tsp garlic powder (or 1 fresh clove)
  • 2 tsp cumin ground
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tbsp flaxseeds ground

Instructions
 

  • Preheat your oven to 180c/530f
  • Put all the ingredients into a food processor and process until they are all combined, adding a little water at a time until your have a mouldable dough. (see notes above)
  • Form the mixture into balls or patties and place on a lined baking tray.
  • Bake for around 30 mins, until a golden brown colour.


Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.


If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com

Does BMI score really indicate health?

BMI (Body mass index) has been used as a measurement of health within the medical industry for over 100 years. This tool is used in many countries across the globe and has propelled as an authority to make the judgement: healthy or sick. The critics are out on how much we can actually trust it, considering the detrimental effect it is having on our relationship with our bodies.

As with everything related to health and wellbeing, the benefits and drawbacks will vary from person to person. To understand where you stand knowledge is key. In this article we are going to delve into where BMI came from, how it catapulted into everyday medical practice AND how it works.

Let’s dive in.

What is BMI? Where did it come from?

To gain perspective on the positives and negative we must first look to how it works and where it originated. You are probably already somewhat familiar with the basics; however it is always worth reviewing.

blue tape measuring on clear glass square weighing scale
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

BMI is calculated body mass in Kilograms divided by height in meters squared (kg/m2). The resulting number is then compared to a chart of recommended measurements as follows:

Below 18.5Underweight
18.5 – 24.9Ideal
25.0 -29.9Overweight
30.0 and aboveMorbidly Obese

.

BMI was first introduced by a mathematician in the early 19th century. It was way to find levels of obesity and famine in areas of the general population. This statistic would help the government to allocate resources. There was no intention to provide a measurement of overall health and wellbeing of an individual.

Think about it

BMI only started to become popular in medicine in the 1980s and heavily promoted in the late 1990s. Not all that long ago.

During that decade, BMI was seen to become more prevalent as the number of people with health issues related to excessive body fat started to increase. Medical professionals encouraged individuals to use BMI as a way to monitor their body fat. Although as we can see clearly for the equation for BMI it in fact measures of overall body mass. Still physicians saw this as a way to indicate and predict a patients health.

When is BMI useful in health management?

As we have seen above the BMI calculation is limited and was never intended as an indicator of health. However it is widely used around the world by physicians and health professionals as a tool to measure health. More accurately, it is simply an indicator of weight proportions. This can in some circumstances be a useful tool for motivation to those who have a substantial amount of excess body fat.

By the way this is not the same thing as someone with a high BMI. We will cover why in the next section.

Correlation shows a measurable goal such as weight or BMI has a great motivational drive towards fat loss. This measurement could be through a calculation such as BMI, but also:

  • Regular weight measurements
  • Regular waist circumference measurements
  • Fitness targets (improved running time/distance)
  • Calliper measurements

BMI as a fat loss motivator, although shown to be effective, is a shaming technique. This is something that on a mental wellbeing level needs to be treated carefully. Continued weighing and calculating to obtain BMI holds the risk of developing obsessive behaviours that can be detrimental to you overall wellbeing. If you are someone who may be susceptible to obsessive behaviours or self shaming, please seek out other methods of motivation for your health based goals.

Why the BMI calculation is flawed

We have covered a few of the issues with BMI and how it is used but it doesn’t stop there….

BMI measures all body mass. It does not take into consideration everything that makes us. Bone mass and muscle mass must be taken into consideration when making judgements about health through measurements of mass. Often with health goals, fat loss is seen as a priority. However, using total body mass measurements not only assumes all body mass is fat, but adds the misconception all fat is unhealthy. There multiple types of fat within our bodies, each with different purposes throughout our bodies.Yes, excess of fat is cause for concern, but it does not mean we should be striving for no body fat.

Acknowledging bone mass is also critical. Not only in observing true mass measurements BUT to spot early risks of poor bone density. Poor Bone density leads to a number of deteriorating bone diseases. When spotted early like most dis-ease are easier to stop and even reverse.

Muscle mass also need to be taken into consideration. As high muscle mass generally has positive health benefits, improving muscle mass is another common health goal. Yet many people with higher muscle mass, may fall into the category of over-weight and obese. This is due to muscle weighing more than fat. This means even with a lower body fat percentage, and an overall healthy body based on BMI an individual could fall into the category deemed as unhealthy.

How do we use this information?

In a nutshell; after personally looking at how flawed BMI measurements are and the affect it has on my clients relationships with their bodies; I have found the benefit does not out weigh the negatives. With this said, for quite some time now it has made sense to me not to use this and similar methods to help my clients through their goals. Instead of fixating on BMI, we focus on retuning to the body. Paying attention, to the little signs our body tells us everyday and honouring them with the care, love and attention it needs.

If this sound like the type of support you need whether through 1 on 1 coaching or through our group Restorative Wellbeing The Circle we are here to help!.

The circle wellness community

Subscribe for £20 per month.


If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com


Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.

Infrared Heat Lamps – Healing with light.

Is infrared heat lamp therapy for you? 

It is estimated that in 2016  20.4% of US adults suffered from chronic pain. Chronic pain can impact every aspect of your life. Thankfully there are more and more options becoming available to help treat chronic pain. These Include increasingly popular infrared light therapy, but like with all therapies there are benefits and risks.

I know what you are thinking: learning about new therapies can be overwhelming. Don’t worry we have you covered. In this article I am going to talk you through the different benefits and risks. Jargon free. Allowing you to decide if infrared light therapy is for you.

woman wearing black camisole
Photo by Engin Akyurt on Pexels.com

But before we delve in, lets talk about why alternative therapies should be an important in your healing journey;

The Healing Revolution

Chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia and arthritis are thriving. It is no wonder we are constantly looking for the latest ways to ease this battle. Prescription pain killers are becoming common place in people lives, but so are their side effects. These range from digestive disorders, immune system damage, addiction and even developing tolerances that make the drugs ineffective. People are weighing up the benefits and negatives of long term pain killer use, then finding it doesn’t make sense. Sending increasing volumes of people to alternatives treatments to make their daily lives more manageable. 

The past decade we have seen a rise in the use of CBD products, mushrooms, and even turmeric. It doesn’t stop there. Patients are accepting that the ‘magic pill’ philosophy of pain relief isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

white labeled bottle and spoon on plate
Photo by Tree of Life Seeds on Pexels.com

The rise in holistic practices isn’t simply from wanting to turn back time and revert back to traditional practices. It grew from science and holistic practices combined. The science world has opened up to investigating the world of holistic ‘miracle cures’ and old wives tales, that have been an ingrained part of human life long before medical science. As holistic and scientific medical practices combine, it has opened up a new future of health and healing. There is always so much more to explore; the past decade in particular has been a large stepping stone. With these leaps and bounds in progress, the general public are able to gain a deeper understanding of the science behind traditional healing practices.

What does this mean for you? In a nutshell, opening up to effective holistic practices could lead to better pain management and in some cases remove the need for medicated pain relief.

How do infrared lamps work

All light therapies work due to light wavelengths. Different light produces different wavelengths, and these effect the body in different ways. Some light wavelength can cause damaged, such as UVA and UVB, known to damage DNA and cells. While other light wavelengths (under the correct conditions) can heal the body. This includes infrared light wavelengths. Infrared light wavelengths target the mitochondria of the cells, this boosts cellular energy production. This has the ability to promote a variety of healing effects throughout the body.

The benefits of infrared heat 

Infrared therapy has several medical benefits, as well as cosmetic benefits

  • Eases acute and chronic muscle and join pain
  • Reduces swelling from oxidative stress
  • Boosts collagen production

One of its biggest appeals is that it is completely non-invasive and painless. If anything it has been said to be relaxing and comforting. Simply creating a feeling of warmth. Something that is particularly appealing to joint pain patients during winter months.

The risks of infrared therapy

There are very few risks associated with infrared therapy. Unlike sunlight and tanning beds, it does not expose you to UV light that damages the skin. It is completely non-invasive. Many other heat based therapies run the risk of burn injury and increased infections. The risks with infrared therapy are considerable lower. The only reports of such negative effects have only been shown through excessive use of home infrared therapy lamps. Use is recommended to as little at 15 minutes per session.

Other ways to benefit from infrared heat therapy.

Personal Use Infrared Heat Lamps make infrared therapy more accessible. Lamps are low in price, fairly easy to store and can be used on demand. Research shows they that they are now the most effective way to receive infrared heat therapy. Thankfully, there are other ways you can benefit from infrared heat therapy:

  • Sauna – infrared saunas have grown in popularity, being easier to maintain and using less space than traditional saunas. With the added benefits of infrared heat its a clear upgrade.
  • Wraps – used to give intense focus to a particular area of the body. They are similar to heat pads that wrap around the body, with the deep targeting benefits of infrared light.
adult beautiful beauty erotic
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Is infrared better than other light therapies?

It is not a question of one being better than the other but what are the light therapies best at treating. There are many forms of light therapy, but these are of most medical note; 

  • Blue light therapy
  • Red light therapy
  • Green light therapy

Blue light therapy – most commonly used for patients with SAD (seasonal affective disorder). Blue light wave lengths have a microbial effect, so are effective as a treatment for severe acne and sun damage.

Red light therapy – this is similar to infrared light 

Green light – Currently being researched, but shows promise in the effective treatment of migraines.

So it all adds up to this. If you’re looking for a non-invasive way to reduce pain, improve your work out recovery or improve your skin condition, infrared therapy could be a good option. 


If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com


Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.

Sign up to our Newsletters for a new Freebie!!

We have created an exclusive new printable especially for our NEW newsletter subscribers!! Who doesn’t love a good newsletter freebie!

What can you expect in from your free gift?

Our free gift for NEW subscribers includes our top 8 ultimate seasoning blends in a handy recipe card format. Perfect to keep to hand whenever you need to add a little bit more flavour to your cooking.

For far too long healthy eating has carried the misconception of being bland and boring. We are here to prove that wrong, and what better what to start that with these nutrient powerhouse seasoning blends, guaranteed to give your wholefood plant based meals the flavour boost they need!

We believe food should be nourishing AND joyful, that why we hold both flavour and nutrition as key when creating recipes. Makes sense right?

What are you waiting for? Sign up to our mailing list below and get your newsletter freebie, as well as weekly exclusive deals, articles and even a few more freebies.

Free Gift

especially for you 🎁

Sign up to our mailing list and receive your exclusive Ultimate Seasoning Mixes recipe cards!

We don’t spam! Read our [link]privacy policy[/link] for more info.

Want more from Restorative Wellbeing, Join us in our exclusive wellbeing community, the circle. The circle is filled with healthy wholefood plant based article, nutritional education and reviews on everything you need to restore your wellbeing.


If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com


Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.

7 Benefits of Rebounding

Looking for an exercise with a difference, something fun that can provide all over health benefits? Rebounding could be for you. 

Although rebounding has been around for a long time, the wide variety of benefits remain the same. The research shows for long term health it is definitely worth considering adding it to your workout routine.

Subscribe to get access

Read more of this content when you subscribe today.

Free Gift

especially for you 🎁

Sign up to our mailing list and receive your exclusive Ultimate Seasoning Mixes recipe cards!

We don’t spam! Read our [link]privacy policy[/link] for more info.

If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! Emily@restorativewellbeing.com


Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.

Vanilla Cashew Biscuits – Vegan and gluten free recipe

These are the perfect cup of tea biscuits. Subtly sweet with a delicious crumbly crunch.

cashew and vanilla biscuits

Like all the recipes here at Restorative wellbeing these biscuits are full or hidden nutritional benefits but inspired by comforting joy of the food you love.

We love biscuits!

Biscuits are a British institution, a cup of tea just wouldn’t be the same without them. However the typical biscuit holds very little nutritional value but clock up over 100 calories, 5 grams fat and 1.2 grams refined sugars! And none of us are eating just one biscuit!

But focusing on a nutritionally dense diet does not mean we have to miss out of biscuits or any of our other favourite treats. No, it just means we have to be aware that not all biscuits are created equal. So far I am yet to find a good substitute that can be bought, so I have created this and many other recipes to serve your biscuity cravings and keep you nutritional goals on track.

If you love this recipe also try;

Why your body will love these biscuits!

Lets break down what makes these biscuits so special.

Cashew butter – Creamy and subtly sweet cashew butter makes an excellent fat source for these biscuits, not only improving the biscuit consistency but giving you body a whole host of nutritional benefits. Cashew butter contains a wide variety of vitamins and minerals, healthy fats, including omega 3 and 6, and is made up of 17.5% protein. This makes it a good all round benefit to a balanced diet.

Vanilla – It is important to note that using natural vanilla extract holds many healing health benefits, however, synthetic vanilla extract is also very commonly sold, and doesn’t hold the same benefits. Here we are just going to talk about natural vanilla extract. High in anti-oxidants and with antibacterial capabilities, shows vanilla can aid towards healthy body functions. Whilst traditionally vanilla has been used as a treatment for gut inflammation and restpitory conditions.

Vanilla Cashew Biscuits

Course Snack

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup oat flour
  • 2 tbsp cashew butter
  • 2 tbsp xylitol
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup water (see notes)

Instructions
 

  • Preheat your oven to 180c
  • First mix together the cashew butter and xylitol
  • Then mix int he vanilla extract, followed but the flour.
  • The dough will seem stiff and dry at this point, but mix it as well as you can, before adding the water a small amount at a time, until you have a soft mouldable consistency (not sticky). If you accidentally go too far, add a little more oat flour.
  • Once you have a nice consistency to the dough, sprinkle some more oat flour over a clean work surface and roll your dough out to around 2 cm thick (these are nice thin crisp biscuits)
  • Use your favourite cutters to cut out as many cookies as you can, placing them on a lined baking sheet as you go along.
  • Place the cookies in the oven and bake for around 15 minuets, until slightly golden brown. Cook in batches until needed.
  • Once cooked through transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely, then enjoy with your favourite drink.

Oat Flour

Xylitol

If you want to support what we do  …….

…. you can donate a coffee here : http://ko-fi.com/restorativewellbeing

…. follow us on social media….

INSTAGRAM (@restorative_wellbeing) ► https://www.instagram.com/restorative_wellbeing

FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/restorativewell

Send me an email! emily@restorativewellbeing.com

And don’t for get to sign up to our mailing list!!!

Free Gift

especially for you 🎁

Sign up to our mailing list and receive your exclusive Ultimate Seasoning Mixes recipe cards!

We don’t spam! Read our [link]privacy policy[/link] for more info.

Please be aware all information in this blog is based on my own personal experience and research, and I am not a medical professional. If you are needing advice about a medical condition, please seek advice from a medical professional.